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Gait changes with tibialis posterior dysfunction

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by Hylton Menz, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest


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    In press with Gait and Posture...

    Changes in gait associated with acute stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction
    S.I. Ringle, S.J. Kavros, B.R. Kotajarvi, D.K. Hansen, H.B. Kitaoka and K.R. Kaufman

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in gait mechanics between patients with acute stage II PTTD and healthy volunteers. Hindfoot and midfoot kinematics, plantar foot pressures and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the posterior tibialis, gastrocnemius, anterior tibialis and the peroneals were measured in five patients with acute stage II PTTD. Kinematics and kinetics were compared to a database of 20 healthy volunteers. EMG and plantar pressure data were obtained from five healthy volunteers. Hindfoot moments and powers were also calculated. The center of pressure excursion index (CPEI) was calculated from the plantar pressures. Significant differences were observed between the two groups, which confirmed clinical observations. Limited hindfoot eversion and increased midfoot external rotation occurred during the first and third rockers. The EMG data suggested that tendon dysfunction in the posterior tibialis is associated with compensatory activity, not only in its antagonists (the peroneals), but also in the anterior tibialis and the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that non-operative treatment of patients with PTTD should consider minimizing the activity of the posterior tibialis as well as the peroneals, the anterior tibialis and the gastrocnemius.
     
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    Posterior tibial dysfunction

    Comparison of foot kinematics between subjects with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction and healthy controls.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2006 Sep;36(9):635-44
    Tome J, Nawoczenski DA, Flemister A, Houck J
     
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    Comparison of Changes in Posterior Tibialis Muscle Length Between Subjects With Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction and Healthy Controls During Walking.
    Neville C, Flemister A, Tome J, Houck JR.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2007;37(11):661-669.
     
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    Foot and ankle kinematics in patients with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction
    Mary Ellen Ness. Jason Long, Richard Marks and Gerald Harris
    Gait & Posture
    Volume 27, Issue 2, February 2008, Pages 331-339

     
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    Ankle and Foot Kinematics Associated with Stage II PTTD During Stance.
    Houck JR, Neville CG, Tome J, Flemister AS.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Jun;30(6):530-9.
     
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    Hindfoot alignment valgus moment arm increases in adult flatfoot with achilles tendon contracture.
    Arangio G, Rogman A, Reed JF.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Nov;30(11):1078-82.
     
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    New radiographic parameters assessing forefoot abduction in the adult acquired flatfoot deformity.
    Ellis SJ, Yu JC, Williams BR, Lee C, Chiu YL, Deland JT.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1168-76.
     
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    Biomechanical and Clinical Factors Related to Stage I Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.
    Rabbito M, Pohl MB, Humble N, Ferber R.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2011 Jul 12. [Epub ahead of print]
     
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    Women With Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Have Diminished Ankle and Hip Muscle Performance
    Kornelia Kulig, John M. Popovich, Lisa M. Noceti-Dewit, Stephen F. Reischl, Dong Kim
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2011;41(9):687-694
     
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    Total and Distributed Plantar Loading in Subjects With Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction During Terminal Stance.
    Neville C, Flemister AS, Houck J.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2013 Jan;34(1):131-9.
     
  12. Chris Gracey

    Chris Gracey Well-Known Member

    Exemplary, thank you.
     
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    An in vivo study of hindfoot 3D kinetics in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) flatfoot based on weight-bearing CT scan.
    Zhang Y, Xu J, Wang X, Huang J, Zhang C, Chen L, Wang C, Ma X.
    Bone Joint Res. 2013 Dec 9;2(12):255-263.
     
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