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Live updates from the Footwear Biomechanics Symposium; Liverpool 2015

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Craig Payne, Jul 8, 2015.

Tags:
  1. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  2. Griff

    Griff Moderator

  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Darren Stefanyshyn
    Footwear Research: Where do we go from here?

    Stressed importance of individual vs general (ie systematic vs subject specific)

    Too many retrospective studies
    Lot of studies lack validation

    Motion control shoes and foot orthotics with medial posting implemented to change variables that were thought to be associated with injury --> studies show we achieved that
    …but did that change injury rates? Evidence would suggest that not the case (eg Ryan et al study from 2010) --> what have we been doing wrong? Maybe looking at wrong variable.

    Biomechanists have not been doing prospective intervention studies

    Daren does not understand how eversion causes knee pain --> challenged us to come up with an explanation.

    Shoes and performance:
    Different athletes need different solutions for improved performance but not sure why
    Different athlete need different bending stiffness for performance

    Which direction to go in:
    Mapping footwear characteristics to injury (ie traction, mass, torsion, bending stiffness, insole texture, cushioning, posting, etc)  map onto different activities and relationship to performance and injury

    This mapping has to be done with prospective studies.

    Ned Federicks in video made comment on the mass customisation of footwear and how they can address individual biomechanics
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Darren's presentation reminded me of one of Peter Cavanagh's a few yrs ago in which he argued for pretty much the same thing ... ie the taking of lab based research to the field or clinic with prospective studies to see if the interventions tested in the lab actually work
     
  5. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Really refreshing to hear a man of Darren's calibre and experience stand in front of a room and be comfortable stating all the things he doesn't yet know or understand. He's been immediately added to my hero list...
     
  6. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Great talk from Darren Stefanyshyn. The summary won't suprise anyone:

    1. We don't know it all and there is a long way to go.
    2. A move toward individualisation and 'mass customisation' is probably key

    Great point made by Jo Hamill in the Q&A: this poses huge problem for shoe manufacturers (is it even logistically possible?)
     
  7. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Sharon Dixon: Influence of variable stiffness footwear in running depends on runner characteristics
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Visas Berki: Correlations between stance time and shear peaks on the plantar skin surface of diabetic and non-diabetic patients
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Wish I could be there. Sounds like a great line-up of speakers!:drinks
     
  10. Athol Thomson

    Athol Thomson Active Member

    Couldn't agree more.

    This looks like a fantastic conference. Keep the updates rolling.

    Cheers
     
  11. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    This afternoons session is right up your street Ahole:
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Athol Thomson

    Athol Thomson Active Member

    Yes Griff that looks superb. Would really love to be there. Just had eye surgery so couldn't travel. The updates are great lads so thanks a million.
     
  13. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Get well soon mate.

    Poster presentations now. Looks to be some gems in here.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Tobias Wunsch and team from Salzburg university have been studying the effects of leaf springed running shoes on lower limb muscle forces in running.

    Compared to a standard EVA midsole mean muscle forces showed a significant reduction for Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Medialis, Gastrocnemius and Soleus.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Sharon Dixon: Influence of increased shoe lateral stiffness on running biomechanics in older females.

    Tested a New Balance prototype with different stiffnesses in sole (ie simulate lateral wedging) and investigated relationship to knee abduction moment (ie the risk factor for knee OA)

    They found no systematic changes, but then went and eliminated some people from the data who demonstrated an adductor moment at midstance. The results showed that the shoe did decrease the abductor moment in those who had an abductor moment (CP comment: data dredging?)
     
  16. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Berki & Davis: Correlations between stance time and shear stress peaks on the plantar skin surface of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    Used a really cool methodolodgy to measure shear stress --> it was not described in detail, but looked impressive. I want to know more.

    Found plenty of differences between the diabetic and non-diabetic groups ... but I ? the clinical implications? ... its was still cool and pretty looking pictures of the shear stress!
     
  17. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Price and Nester: Is retail footwear fit for purpose for the feet of adults who are obese

    no
     
  18. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    AlBagdhadi et al: Matching stress and strain on the foot during the loading phase of gait

    They matching plantar pressure measurements to foot morphology measurements --> cool
     
  19. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Kobayashi et al: How do too big shoes affect to the joint kinematcs of kids gait pattern?

    To allow for growth most parents buy shoes too big for kids to allow for growth. Is that a problem?

    Found:
    - as shoe size increased --> decreased stride length and decreased walking speed; minimum toe clearance increased

    Concluded: "We found that wearing shoes that are oversized negativly impacted gait parameters"
     
  20. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Oke: Footwear mismatch - do we wear correct sized shoes?

    no

     
  21. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Tsujimoto et a: Primary Factors affect foot eversion dynamics during the stance phase of running

    Aim was to identify those factors that were primary factors responsible for the rearfoot eversion moment due to GRF during the stance phase of running.

     
  22. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Sinclair et al: Influence of barefoot and shod running on limb and joint stiffness characteristics during running

    Pretty much showed that:
    Higher knee joint stiffness in barefoot condition compared to barefoot inspired shoes and conventional running shoes
    Ankle joint stiffness was higher in the conventional running shoes compare to barefoot

     
  23. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Trudeau et al: Functional grouping of runners based on plantar pressures
    Used a pattern recognition tool to looks for groups on runners based on plantar pressure measurements.
    Identified two groups that had significantly different plantar pressure patterns.

    Big difference in ages between the two groups --> maybe hint as to mechanism for differences (eg tissue property changes; muscle strength differnces)

    (CP comment: when watching the video of the two patterns, the pattern of the hold group had much less first met head loading --> is that the windlass not working in that group?)
     
  24. Windlass is "working" even if they were dead. The plantar fascia attaches into not just the great toe. If none of the toes don't dorsiflex, this isn't that the windlass is "not working", merely that the plantarflexion moment is greater than the dorsiflexion moment acting about the metatarsophalangeal joint(s) at that instant in time. This does in no way = the windlass "not working". Sorry Craig, I hate statements like: "the windlass is not working". The windass mechansim cannot be resolved into a binary variable, see Hicks.
     
  25. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    OK, I should have said that the two videos of the distinct patterns represented Bojson-Mollor's high gear and low gear propulsion :D
     
  26. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Eshraghi: Hallux valgus and plantar pressures

    Theory: force does not move through one lines like CoP measure --> instead it moves along other directions.
    Used Markov chain transition matrices to measures changes and transfer of force in metatarsal regions that was collected by RSScan (maths way to complicated for me)

    Somehow this information can help in shoe design for hallux valgus....
     
  27. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Baltich et al: The influence of ankle strength exercise training on running injury risk factors

    Increase in hip/core strengthening does not affect injury rate in runners.

    Does ankle strength matter?

    Aim of study : ankle strength and running injury

    129 runners; 8 week program
    - 43 functional strengthening (Lunges, squats, hopping, jumps)
    - 43 resistance strengthening (TheraBand)
    - 43 control (stretching)

    Isokinetc torque used to measure change in ankle strength; any restriction in running due to injury was assessed by online diary --> given a severity score (100=time loss injury)

    Study was powered to look at strength changes and not injury rates

    Results:
    - functional group had 62 injuries/1000hrs running
    - Resistance 41.7
    - Stretching 58.7
    ....no stat differences

    Time loss injuries - only 4 -- all 4 in functional training group; all those 4 were in the foot

    Concluded:
    Resistance training was more effective as increasing strength
    Functional training related in more injuries
     
  28. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Bishop et al: Prelim investigation of the immediate effects of footwear and custom foot orthotics on the foot in patients with plantar fasciitis

    10 subjects with PF: 3 conditions: barefoot; Asics Gel Nimbus; Custom orthotics + Nimbus
    Custom orthotic prescription based on a focus group with podiatrists

    Comfort results: - orthotic group reported most comfort and less pain
    Orthotics:
    -reduced eversion
    -increased inversion moment
    -increased peak TMT dorsiflexion (higher arch height)

    HOWEVER, response was variable; response in some favored shoe; some favored orthotics --- need to explore why?

    Are small biomechanical effects important clinical effects?
     
  29. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Announcement of 2016 iFab .. in Berlin
     

    Attached Files:

  30. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Parilla et al: Low cost 3d scanner using an app

    Reconstructed 3D model of foot from 3 images taken of foot by smartphone
     
  31. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    This could well be a huge feature of future shoe choices (commercially) given that shoefitr has been acquired by Amazon. It isn't unreasonable to predict that patients will 3D scan their feet at home and upload to Amazon which will then suggest shoes for them based on their dimensions.

    Chris Nester spoke of this at the biomechanics summer school in Manchester a few weeks ago. Keep an eye on the Right Shoes app:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  32. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Lewinson: Control Conditions for Footwear insole and orthotic research

    Do "control" orthotics/insoles/insert have effects?

    Study looked at effects of "controls" conditions on knee and ankle moments and max GRF

    Results - no differences for walking
    In running, differences in ankle inversion moment - small and only between 2 of the 4 conditions

    HOWEVER - individual differences were very notable in both directions

    the control conditions did have affects on the individual's biomechanics in ~50% (ie half participants had a biomechanical change of grater than 10%)
     
  33. 'Did they mention the Piper rhythm ? http://www.podiatry-arena.com/podiatry-forum/showthread.php?t=54956
     
  34. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    He's in the room so he did hear it ;-)
     
  35. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Final slide from the presentation:
     

    Attached Files:

  36. I assume Toni Arndt is there too if you meet him say Hi been ages since I have seen him
     
  37. toomoon

    toomoon Well-Known Member

    Can I just put a word of caution here in relation to posting photos of conclusions from talks without the authors permission. From my perspective, if this were me, I would be less than impressed, especially if it were pilot data to a larger study. The slides presented in conferences are the authors IP, and I hope I do not come off as being prissy, but one does need to be careful. I have no problem with reproduction of slides that give a generic overview.. for example an introductory slide, but I think we need to be really careful about reproducing more sensitive slides. I have already been made aware that at least one presenter whose slides appear on this thread, is not impressed at all.. fair enough. Caution advised...
     
  38. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Fair points. Grab me and let me know which one and I will take down!
     
  39. Simon is correct. We should probably all ask permission of the lecturer at seminars before we reproduce and/or post up on any public website a copy of one or any of their presentation slides. I see no problem with summaries of the slides being posted up in text form, without photos.

    As far as I'm concerned at any of my lectures, I really don't mind photos of my slides that are being projected onto a seminar screen being published. However, I would take exception to someone using my actual PowerPoint slide digital image to post it up on Podiatry Arena without my permission.

    In other words, to be safe, please ask permission of the lecturer first before their slide images are published here on Podiatry Arena, or on any public website.
     
  40. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Great presentation from Jessica Marie Deneweth on the work the team at the University of Michigan on individual-specific determinants of successful adaptation to minimal and maximal running shoes.

    Summary:
    - Early results suggest that maximal shoes do not require as large a gait modification as minimal shoes
    - Foot posture metrics do not appear relevant to predict response
    - Minimal and maximal adoptions appear to be individual specific
     
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