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Obesity and Achilles tendon strain

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Overweight and obesity alters the cumulative transverse strain in the Achilles tendon immediately following exercise
    Scott C. Wearing, Sue L. Hooper, Nicole L. Grigg, Gregory Nolan, James E. Smeathers
    Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; Available online 22 December 2012
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Micron. 2012 Feb;43(2-3):463-9. doi: 10.1016/j.micron.2011.11.002. Epub 2011 Nov 18.
    Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    PMID: 22137973 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
     
  4. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Even though the biological structure and the physiological mechanism is altered mechanical tendon pathology is still not the result of these changes but rather the effect of of applied force.

    I find that most people I treat with mechanical tendon pathology are not obese but usually active individuals with what would appear to be BMI lower than 27.5 (not that I measure this as a matter of course so this is just my impression)

    This would seem to make sense tho since fat people are generally not very active people, hence they are fat. Therefore the forces applied to the tendon of a low activity person might be lower than someone who is engaged in high activity sporting
    person. While there may be the tendency to mechanical trauma at lower stress levels in the tendon of the obese these pathological stress levels may not be attained as often as they are in the more active person.

    Regards Dave Smith
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Body Mass Index and Achilles Tendonitis; A 10-Year Retrospective Analysis
    Erin E. Klein, Lowell Weil Jr, Lowell Scott Weil Sr, Adam E. Fleischer, DPM, MPH
    Foot Ankle Spec May 17, 2013
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Correlation of Achilles Tendinopathy and Body Mass Index
    Ryan T. Scott, Christopher F. Hyer, Angela Granata
    Foot Ankle Spec May 17, 2013
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release on this study:
     
  8. Deka08

    Deka08 Active Member

    "The study examined nearly 1000 patients who presented to the Weil clinic with plantar fasciitis between 2002 and 2011."

    Is this an error? Ie supposed to be Achilles tendonitis not plantar fasciitis.
    Or was there a coincidental plantar fasciitis/achilles tendonitis study or retro spective link?

    Cheers
     
  9. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

    It is confusing as the heading for the actual press release (which we deliberately left out) actually said "heel pain"....someone at the Weil F & A Institute must have got it wrong.

    This was the press release title: "Age and Body Mass Index Linked to Heel Pain" http://www.pr.com/press-release/504251
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  11. Lizzy_b

    Lizzy_b Member

    I just read through the article and i would like to ask if it is acceptable to extrapolate the results from "... thirty health adult males from a university faculty..." (Wearing 2013) to children under the age of 12?
    A. Elizabeth
     
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