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Podiatry GPA and residency

Discussion in 'USA' started by CaptainJackSparrow83, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. CaptainJackSparrow83

    CaptainJackSparrow83 Welcome New Poster


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    Based on my research looks like you can get a residency with anywhere from a 4.0 to 2.5 GPA.
    What defines the good residency and bad residency?
    Does it translate to job placement?
     
  2. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    GPA and residency: will depend on the program but any 'good' program will likely want 3+

    What is 'good' and 'bad'. That's the function of the externship for the prospective resident to visit and evaluate the program. You meet and speak with the Attendings, and hopefully you get to speak with some >honest< resident at the facility to give you the low down 'warts n'all'. Every program has good and bad points. Be mindful that many programs might likely show you the best parts, and might conceal the less desirable parts. Like everything else, it's a sales game. Trust your gut. If all the residents there look miserable, fight all the time, etc - move on.

    Also: consider where you want to live and spend the next 3-4 years. Consider if you need a high surgical focus and if so what kind of surgery. A good program should be well rounded and provide exposure to all facets of podiatric practice.

    A for job placement - not sure if there is a direct correlation. Your new boss will likely be more interested to know how you fit into the organization and what you have to offer. EQ over IQ.
     
  3. CaptainJackSparrow83

    CaptainJackSparrow83 Welcome New Poster

    Thanks, to be honest the basic sciences arent for me, and I am quite tired. im not trying to say im lazy but no matter how hard I try I just cant match my peers scores. So below a 3.0 there is still a chance for a residency. Are these residencies looked down upon?
     
  4. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    Possibly, some employers would be concerned, others would not. If an individual is flexible and can relocate there should be room for all.

    Without doubt, some programs carry a certain 'kudos' and other programs attract some ridicule. It's a bit like going to an Ivy League school. But, you also get good workers, bright people etc flourishing and arising from regular 'schools'.

    Employers want people who have a work ethic, are bright, work independently, understand the business etc. Whatever residency you attend, you have an opportunity to shine, go the extra mile, stand out, get good references.
     
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