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Poor balance predicts Alzheimer's

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by NewsBot, May 23, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The BBC are reporting:
    Poor balance predicts Alzheimer's
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Tuckersm

    Tuckersm Well-Known Member

    This is the Abstract

     
  4. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest

    There is also evidence that walking may prevent (or delay the onset of) cognitive impairment:

    Arch Intern Med. 2001 Jul 23;161(14):1703-8.

    A prospective study of physical activity and cognitive decline in elderly women: women who walk

    Yaffe K, Barnes D, Nevitt M, Lui LY, Covinsky K.

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested that physical activity is positively associated with cognitive function in elderly persons. Evidence about this association has been limited by the cross-sectional design of most studies and by the frequent lack of adjustment for potential confounding variables. We determined whether physical activity is associated with cognitive decline in a prospective study of older women. METHODS: We studied 5925 predominantly white community-dwelling women (aged > or =65 years) who were recruited at 4 clinical centers and were without baseline cognitive impairment or physical limitations. We measured cognitive performance using a modified Mini-Mental State Examination at baseline and 6 to 8 years later. Physical activity was measured by self-reported blocks (1 block approximately 160 m) walked per week and by total kilocalories (energy) expended per week in recreation, blocks walked, and stairs climbed. Cognitive decline was defined as a 3-point decline or greater on repeated modified Mini-Mental State Examination. RESULTS: Women with a greater physical activity level at baseline were less likely to experience cognitive
    decline during the 6 to 8 years of follow-up: cognitive decline occurred in 17%, 18%, 22%, and 24% of those in the highest, third, second, and lowest quartile of blocks walked per week (P< .001 for trend). Almost identical results were obtained by quartile of total kilocalories expended per week. After adjustment for age, educational level, comorbid conditions, smoking status, estrogen use, and functional limitation, women in the highest quartile remained less likely than women in the lowest quartile to develop cognitive decline (for blocks walked: odds ratio, 0.66 [95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.82]; for total kilocalories: odds ratio, 0.74 [95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.90]). CONCLUSIONS: Women with higher levels of baseline physical activity were less likely to develop cognitive decline. This association was not explained by differences in baseline function or health status. This finding supports the hypothesis that physical activity prevents cognitive decline in older community-dwelling women.
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A longitudinal study of gait function and characteristics of gait disturbance in individuals with Alzheimer's disease
    Ylva Cederval, Kjartan Halvorsen, Anna Cristina Åberg
    Gait & Posture; Article in Press
     
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