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Structures involved in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Correlation between three-dimensional medial longitudinal arch joint complex mobility and medial arch angle in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction
    Yi-junZhang et al
    Foot and Ankle Surgery; 12 September 2018
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Morphometric Measurements of the Calcaneus in Adults with Stage IIb, Posterior Tibial Tendon
    Dysfunction: Is the Lateral Column Short?

    Kempland Walley, BS, Evan Roush, Chris Stauch, Allen Kunselman, MA, Kaitlin Saloky, BS, Gregory Lewis, PhD, Michael
    Aynardi, MD
    AOFAS Annual Meeting 2018 1
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Tendon Morphology in Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction Is Associated with a Clinical
    Measure of Deep Posterior Compartment Strength

    Christopher Neville, PhD, Frederick Lemley, MD
    AOFAS Annual Meeting 2018 1
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Identification of the Medial Column Line collapse variation is Crucial in Flat Foot Management
    Lyndon Mason, FRCS(Tr&Orth), Joseph Alsousou, PhD, Phil Ellison, MCSP, Andrew Molloy, FRCS(Tr&Orth)
    AOFAS Annual Meeting 2018 1
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    An Anatomic Study of the Naviculocuneiform Ligament and Its Possible Role Maintaining the Medial Longitudinal Arch.
    Swanton E et al
    Foot Ankle Int. 2018 Nov 22:1071100718811638.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Biomechanical stress analysis of the main soft tissues associated with the development of adult acquired flatfoot deformity
    ChristianCifuentes-De la PortillaacRicardoLarrainzar-GarijobJavierBayoda
    Clinical Biomechanics Volume 61, January 2019, Pages 163-171
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Occurrence of Lateral Ankle Ligament Disease With Stage 2 to 3 Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity Confirmed via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Retrospective Study
    ShamPersaud et al
    The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery; 21 December 2018
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Analysis of the main passive soft tissues associated with adult acquired flatfoot deformity development: A computational modeling approach
    ChristianCifuentes-De la PortillaacRicardoLarrainzar-GarijobJavierBayod
    Journal of Biomechanics; 9 January 2019
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Forefoot Supination and Medial Column Instability in the Setting of AAFD: The Role of the Medial Column
    Eildar Abyar; Andrés E. O’Daly; Ashish B. Shah; Michael D. Johnson
    Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery. Publish Ahead of Print():, JAN 2019
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Tenosynovial fluid as an indication of early posterior tibial tendon dysfunction in patients with normal tendon appearance
    Felix M. GonzalezElie HarmoucheDouglas D. RobertsonMonica UmpierrezAdam D. SingerYara YounanJason Bariteau
    Skeletal Radiology: 19 February 2019
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: Imperfect specificity of magnetic resonance imaging
    Alex C.LesiakJames D.Michelson
    Foot and Ankle Surgery; 12 March 2019
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Evaluation of peritalar subluxation in adult acquired flatfoot deformity using computed tomography and weightbearing multiplanar imaging.
    Kunas GC et al
    Foot Ankle Surg. 2018 Dec;24(6):495-500
     
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