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Structures involved in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.


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    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: what other structures are involved in the development of acquired adult flat foot?
    Herráiz Hidalgo L, Carrascoso Arranz J, Recio Rodríguez M, Jiménez De La Peña M, Cano Alonso R, Alvarez Moreno E, Martínez De Vega Fernández V.
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  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Oh yeah, like if you arrive home and examine the fridge and its crushed and you notice that most of the bricks are not joined together and the stairway leads up to a gaping hole and the bathroom is in the garden then I can corroborate the association between these findings and your house falling down. Knowledge of this association can be useful in reaching for a bottle of scotch.:bang:

    Dave Smith
     
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    Could Failure of the Spring Ligament Complex Be the Driving Force behind the Development of the Adult Flatfoot Deformity?
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    Comparison of Deformity with Respect to the Talus in Patients with Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction and Controls Using Multiplanar Weight-Bearing Imaging or Conventional Radiography
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    Imaging of Adult Flatfoot: Correlation of Radiographic Measurements With MRI.
    Lin YC, Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lamb J, Kung JW, Yablon CM, Wu JS.
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    Measurement of radiological parameters and Logistic regression analysis for adult acquired flatfoot
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    Weight-bearing three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of the forefoot in patients with flatfoot deformity
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  16. NewsBot

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  18. NewsBot

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  19. efuller

    efuller Well-Known Member

    If you just did a little free body diagram analysis.... The tendon passes mostly medial to the joint and not plantar. Yes, there are some slips that go plantar, but they don't slide relative to the other attachments on the medial side of the navicular. When there is tension in the posterior tibial tendon you directly create an adduction moment on the forefoot. There will also be an STJ supination moment. The supination moment will tend to shift the force on the forefoot more laterally. So, with PT muscle weakness you loose that lateral shift of ground reaction force. If the patient has enough range of motion of eversion they will have high loads on the medial forefoot. These high medial forefoot loads are what causes the medial column faulting that is often seen with PT dysfunction.

    Eric
     
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