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Why Most Published Research Findings are False

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by wdd, Apr 24, 2014.

Tags:
  1. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  3. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    If a published article concludes that the findings of published articles are not to be trusted... Do we trust it..? ;)
     
  4. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Active Member

    Craig,

    read your article on "foot pronation and leg length discrepancy"

    do have another issue with compensations for a leg length difference that I will get into another day, but in the meantime, ponder this: When you are running, only one leg is on the ground at a time. If there is a structural leg length difference, how does the body even know the leg is short if only one leg in on the ground?

    Good question Craig,

    It may be a bio-symmetric proprioception that gives bio- feedback to the brain, which causes that attempt at compensatory biomechanics of the body, which results in a “functional” shortage, which is as you know a rotation of the ileum. Part of that feedback may include the time difference betwwen one foot on the ground versus the other. What do you think?
     
  5. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Never heard of "bio-symmetric proprioception", so Google'd it. Google not heard of it either
     
  6. Something else he made up......:pigs::pigs::pigs:
     
  7. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    When you are running, only one leg is on the ground at a time. If there is a structural leg length difference, how does the body even know the leg is short if only one leg in on the ground?

    I may be misunderstanding the question completely and if I am I am sure that you will soon let me know.

    Just because the body is running (with only one or even no legs on the ground) why should it have 'forgotten' the relative length of the legs pertaining when it was previously standing?

    Dennis might have invented a phrase but it would seem to point in the right direction, no?

    Bill
     
  8. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Active Member

    Never heard of "bio-symmetric proprioception", so Google'd it. Google not heard of it either

    Yes, I made this up..... actually I “coined” it. I am grateful that you googled it and google was unaware as well. That's great, I actually beat google to a term because if you google each of the words:

    Bio

    What is Biotechnology?
    At its simplest, biotechnology is technology based on biology -

    Symmetric | Define Symmetric at Dictionary.com

    characterized by or exhibiting symmetry;


    Proprioception | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation

    The term proprioception is used to describe the sensory information that contributes to the sense of position of self and movement.

    Kirby proposes we think like engineers, I would add, to think out of the box.

    Biofeedback Eeg - Brain-Trainer.com‎

    BioFeedback & Brain Training. To Change Your Mind Train Your Brain!
     
  9. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Haven't you rather strayed from the op?
     
  10. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    The art of science is often given extra color to draw viewership, sponsorship and a consistant paycheck (ie tenured professorships).

    "There is also Dr Ioannidis’s pet offender: publication bias. Not all studies that are conducted get published, and the ones which do tend to be those that have significant results. That leaves a skewed impression of the evidence."

    It is difficult not to over express the significant results one may have in hopes for further research funding.

    With the sensational significant results as reported here even an article on over reporting may be over reporting...

    "A recent series of articles in the Lancet noted that, in 2010, about $200 billion (an astonishing 85% of the world’s spending on medical research) was squandered on studies that were flawed in their design, redundant, never published or poorly reported".

    A Hui Hou,
    Steve
     
  11. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

  12. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    Good for Stanford.

    Having a solid research center will help improve thier image.

    One of the harder things to do in science investigation is being able to prove and report that there is no significant differences. At times you may not make alot of friends with this type of reporting (nor money) but you hold science tethered to solid ground.

    If we reread the thread on Should Podiatrist Think Like Engineers, Dr. Nigg published alot of negitives in chapter four of his book "Biomechanics of Sports Shoes." a great book by the way if you are interested in advanced learning.

    It could be construed that Dr. Nigg is the Great Niggator one of the hardest jobs in science.

    I think solid scientific research has been developing well since the Renaissance and will continue to do so with more clarity in the future. With a little help from our electronic medical records and computerized data collection and computation. Which will mean less math and spelling erors.

    http://www.biographyonline.net/people/famous/renaissance.html

    A Hui Hou,
    Steve
     
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